Friday, May 7, 2021

Why don’t We Have HIV Vaccine yet? - Health and Medicine 22

Fig 01- Tulip as illustration

Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) has been identified by Luc Montagnier and his team from Pasteur Institute, France in 1983.

It is mean that HIV has been known “formally” very long time ago, yet, we have no vaccine so far.

Yes, we have HIV’s drugs in the market, but to “suppress” virus amount in the blood only.

Drugs are prescribed to maintain the virus load at lower level, and hope:

- no transmission of virus to others, especially sex partners
- immune system has opportunity to rebuild itself.
- HIV free babies from infected mothers

Unfortunately, as reported by Our World in Data (2014, and revised in 2019) that almost 1 million people died per year caused by HIV/AIDS worldwide. The death mainly in the very developing countries.

The question then, Why don’t We have vaccine yet to combat HIV/AIDS diseases?


Fig 02- Yellow tulip


Fig 03- Wild flowers in backyard

Two main reasons why don’t We have vaccine yet to combat HIV/AIDS diseases:

- scientific or knowledge
- economics (funding)

Molecules on HIV surface look like to protein in healthy people, hence, our immune system difficult to recognize its.

This is a kind of “deception” which make virus has advantage to infect cells in patient’s body, then destroy immune system.

This is the main reason why vaccine inventors can’t develop HIV vaccine until recently.

In respect to economics, no “big money” yet to develop HIV vaccines compared to Covid 19 vaccines, just for example.

Hope, these hurdles could be solved in near future!

27 comments:

  1. Lovely floral photos ~ Xo

    Living moment by moment,

    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

    ReplyDelete
  2. ...and religion has labeled HIV as a problem of sinful people.

    ReplyDelete
  3. That's a good question Tanza what you ask because now with the corona virus they were quick to catch it but unfortunately with this virus you don't hear much and many people are waiting for this too. Always the case: whoever survives has completely eliminated the virus from his body and is immune for the rest of his life. This is what the concept of vaccinations is based on: give the body such an initial - harmless - infection, and nature does the rest. But the vaccine is indeed still there after almost forty years after the discovery of the AIDS virus and still not there. ultimate vaccine in sight. So it is and question without answer because I will not know this either. What I do know is that one can be vaccinated for the coronavirus if one has the HIV and perhaps this also offers some protection but this question you asking is my answer; i do not know. The duch news papers say also the same.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I see ......


      Thanks-
      Why don’t We Have HIV Vaccine yet? - Health and Medicine 22
      -
      Fig 01- Tulip as illustration

      Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) has been identified by Luc Montagnier and his team from Pasteur Institute, France in 1983.

      It is mean that HIV has been known “formally” very long time ago, yet, we have no vaccine so far.

      Yes, we have HIV’s drugs in the market, but to “suppress” virus amount in the blood only.

      Drugs are prescribed to maintain the virus load at lower level, and hope:

      - no transmission of virus to others, especially sex partners
      - immune system has opportunity to rebuild itself.
      - HIV free babies from infected mothers
      Unfortunately, as reported by Our World in Data (2014, and revised in 2019) that almost 1 million people died per year caused by HIV/AIDS worldwide. The death mainly in the very developing countries.

      The question then, Why don’t We have vaccine yet to combat HIV/AIDS diseases?

      Delete
  4. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  5. A HIV vaccine will be a game changer.

    ReplyDelete
  6. A HIV vaccine will great news.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Indeed


      Thanks-
      Why don’t We Have HIV Vaccine yet? - Health and Medicine 22
      -
      Fig 02- Yellow tulip

      Delete
  7. J'aime bien les tulipes!
    J'espère que ce vaccins existera bientôt et qu'on pourra aussi mieux soigner les cancers.
    Bon weekend

    ReplyDelete
  8. Preciosos tulipanes.
    Ojalá pronto haya vacunas para todo tipo de enfermedades.
    Buena noche. Cuídate.
    Un abrazo.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks-
      Why don’t We Have HIV Vaccine yet? - Health and Medicine 22
      -
      Fig 03- Wild flowers in backyard
      Two main reasons why don’t We have vaccine yet to combat HIV/AIDS diseases:

      - scientific or knowledge
      - economics (funding)
      Molecules on HIV surface look like to protein in healthy people, hence, our immune system difficult to recognize its.

      This is a kind of “deception” which make virus has advantage to infect cells in patient’s body, then destroy immune system.

      This is the main reason why vaccine inventors can’t develop HIV vaccine until recently.

      In respect to economics, no “big money” yet to develop HIV vaccines compared to Covid 19 vaccines, just for example.

      Hope, these hurdles could be solved in near future!

      Delete
  9. We have known hiv for about 20 or more years but there is no vaccine about it. Too bad

    ReplyDelete
  10. I bet they have the cure they just don't find it profitable to share it with us.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Beautiful flowers on the photos ��

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks-
      Why don’t We Have HIV Vaccine yet? - Health and Medicine 22
      -
      Fig 01- Tulip as illustration

      Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) has been identified by Luc Montagnier and his team from Pasteur Institute, France in 1983.

      It is mean that HIV has been known “formally” very long time ago, yet, we have no vaccine so far.

      Yes, we have HIV’s drugs in the market, but to “suppress” virus amount in the blood only.

      Drugs are prescribed to maintain the virus load at lower level, and hope:

      - no transmission of virus to others, especially sex partners
      - immune system has opportunity to rebuild itself.
      - HIV free babies from infected mothers
      Unfortunately, as reported by Our World in Data (2014, and revised in 2019) that almost 1 million people died per year caused by HIV/AIDS worldwide. The death mainly in the very developing countries.

      The question then, Why don’t We have vaccine yet to combat HIV/AIDS diseases?

      Delete
  12. Such lovely flowers. Hard to concentrate on the HIV matter. It is sad that more money isn't spent on this disease.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Lovely mother's day flowers! HIV is a situation that I am sure will always haunt us. Lets hope Biden can spare some of his funds on HIV research. But so much is falling apart at the borders, infrastructure. It is a sore subject that is being overlooked.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hope so...



      Thanks-
      Why don’t We Have HIV Vaccine yet? - Health and Medicine 22
      -
      Fig 02- Yellow tulip

      Delete
  14. I hope these hurdles can be cleared also! Gorgeous spring flowers. :)

    ReplyDelete
  15. Replies
    1. Thanks-
      Why don’t We Have HIV Vaccine yet? - Health and Medicine 22
      -
      Fig 03- Wild flowers in backyard
      Two main reasons why don’t We have vaccine yet to combat HIV/AIDS diseases:

      - scientific or knowledge
      - economics (funding)
      Molecules on HIV surface look like to protein in healthy people, hence, our immune system difficult to recognize its.

      This is a kind of “deception” which make virus has advantage to infect cells in patient’s body, then destroy immune system.

      This is the main reason why vaccine inventors can’t develop HIV vaccine until recently.

      In respect to economics, no “big money” yet to develop HIV vaccines compared to Covid 19 vaccines, just for example.

      Hope, these hurdles could be solved in near future!

      Delete
  16. Tanza, Part of the problem in developing an HIV vaccine is that the HIV virus has a very high genetic variability...it mutates very quickly...so a vaccine has to cover a very rapidly changing virus. Many trials have shown no efficacy, but one HIV vaccine regimen, RV 144, has been shown to prevent HIV in some individuals in Thailand. Hopefully, a vaccine will result soon. Take Care, Big Daddy Dave

    ReplyDelete

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